Bought by the Blood

July 3, 2011

Disney Isn’t The Enemy and The Offices of Christ

Earlier this week I read a great blog post from Allen Yeh called, “Why Disney Princesses Are Bad.”  Allen makes some great points about how the Disney princess mindset isn’t helpful for Christian girls and instead we should instill in them the mindset that are priests and not princesses, based on Hebrews 4:16.  The article is excellent, especially for anyone raising daughters.

My only one gripe with the article, is that as we think about Christ Offices, He was more then just a priest, He was also a king and a prophet.  Since Christ is a king, that means that as his adopted children, we are all princes and princes.  Here is a great excerpt from Elyse Fitzpatrick’s book, “Give Them Grace,” on that topic.

Little girls should be protected from thinking that their worth is measured by whether a little boy likes them and think they’re cute or pretty. They need to be taught that loves has been given to them by their Savior and that they don’t need to dress up like a princess to get it. They can be taught that they are the love and delight of their Savior and that he is indeed the great Prince of Heaven. They can read stories about princesses and dress up and pretend. They can use their imagination to imagine being loved by a great prince because, after all, they have been.

Boy should be encouraged to love their sisters and friends who are girls and to respect women and not treat them as having no value except in their appearance. Young boys need to be taught to love, respect, and protect girls because they have been created in the image of God and have been loved by the great warrior Prince.

Lastly, we all fulfill the role of prophet.  That does not mean we walk around saying, “Thus say the Lord,” as we give out revelations from God’s unrevealed will. To raise my kids to be prophets will be to raise them to love God’s Word and encourage them to be quick to build others with wisdom from the Bible and not from secular culture.  Girls will have a tendency to gossip, so if I raise my daughters to be prophetesses that means they will put to death gossip and only speak that which is true and builds others up.  Girls, may also be quick to listen to their feelings, so it is my job to teach them to listen primarily to God’s Word and have that be the primary voice that they echo and let guide them.  Boy can exalt in sports teams and have athletes be their heroes, but as a prophet, instead of celebrating a great sports highlight, I will teach them to ultimately exalt in what Jesus did for them on the cross. A prophet hears God’s word and communicates it to others, that is my prayer for my kids.

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June 4, 2011

Give Them Grace by Elyse Fitzpatrick – A Review

With some parenting books, it is hard to read them cover to cover.  Often times when reading a parenting book I’ll go to the table of contents and flip to the section that covers the age range of my child.  “Give Them Grace: Dazzling Your Kids With The Love of Jesus” by Elyse Fitzpatrick and Jessica Thompson is different, you will not only read it cover to cover, but also find yourself reading it again and again.  This book will help you to see that your child’s biggest problem isn’t their sinful action, but their sinful hearts.  When reading this book you will see that your parenting can never be good enough, but only God’s grace can make your parenting sufficient to transform your child.

This book is written without being divided into practical application for the age range of children.  The reason for this is because when dealing with toddlers, teenagers and even adults there is no difference with the root of issues that come up.  Kids, just like adults, don’t need more rules to make them good and bring them closer to God.  “Give Them Grace” does not ignore the need for rules, training and discipline but it gives the crucial reminder that all of that is meant to lead to kids to Jesus.  “We are commanded to give them the law so that they will be crushed by it and see their need for a Savior. The law won’t make them good. It will make them despair of ever being good enough and in that way it will make them open to the love, sacrifice and welcome of their Savior, Jesus Christ.”

It isn’t just kids who need Jesus, but also parents.  The task of parenting is impossible without God’s grace.  Our best effort at parenting might produce “good kids” but it won’t change their hearts.  “Raising good kids is utterly impossible unless they are drawn by the Holy Spirit to put their faith in the goodness of another. You cannot raise good kids, because you’re not a good parent. There is only one good Parent, and he had one good Son. Together, this Father and Son accomplished everything that needed to be done to rescue us and our children from certain destruction.” One of the things I appreciated about this book is the humility of the authors.  They don’t claim to have it down or be good parents.  They are in the same boat as all of us and write with humility as they proclaim their own need for grace.

I wish Crossway would allow me to give out one free chapter of this book for you to read because by just reading one chapter I know you’d be convinced to buy the whole book.  Even if Crossway would allow me to give away one free chapter to convince readers to buy the book, it would be hard for me to pick just one that I think people should read because they are all so good.  If you want to apply the gospel to parenting and have your parenting be saturated in the gospel then I could not encourage you enough to buy this book.

A quick note to the men: this is the first Elyse Fitzpatrick book I have ever read.  My wife has read me selections of “Because He Loves Me” and I thought that book sounds good, but the cover is to feminine for me, maybe I’ll read it when an edition comes out with a camouflage cover.  Next my wife shared portions of “Comforts From The Cross,” the cover was less girly, but I feared losing man points because this wasn’t “Strength From The Cross.”  Please don’t make the mistake that Elyse Fitzpatrick only writes for a female audience.  This book isn’t just for mom’s, but also for dad’s.

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